Venezuela Government vs. US government

The below is quoted from Venezuelananalysis.com and gives a stark contrast to what American corporate news outlets would have us believe about Venezuela’s government and, in particular, Hugo Chavez.  Note that the US government only seems to pass laws that strengthen intelligence-gathering organizations and weaken civil liberties, while Chavez calls such measures “indefensible.”

Also, can you imagine George Bush ever saying America is a country devoted to human rights?  Even if he did, I’d laugh out loud at his track record, which includes 6- or 7-figure death tolls for Iraqi civilians.

Opposition and human rights groups had vehemently criticized the law because, among other things, it required citizens to cooperate with intelligence agencies when they requested information. Chavez himself admitted a mere week after signing the law that this particular article was indeed “indefensible” and would require a re-writing of the law.

The law as it was originally passed would not stand because his government is “a government of human rights, a socialist government that does not persecute, does not accept persecution, nor will it persecute anyone,” said Chavez on Tuesday.

The next time you see or hear someone bashing on Venezuela’s government or Hugo Chavez, take a moment and remember which country is the world’s #1 terrorism sponsor and whether you’ve ever heard George Bush say the phrase “human rights.”  If you want a president who cares about human rights instead of corporate rights and intelligence-gathering, vote for Ralph Nader this November.

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~ by Daniel on 16 June, 2008.

2 Responses to “Venezuela Government vs. US government”

  1. “Chávez himself admitted a mere week after signing the law…”

    Wait! Is someone saying tha Chávez didn’t read what he signs?

    But wait, there is more! That law was made by Chávez himself (or his consultants), it was not passed by the National Assembly, so, did he made a law with a particular “indefensible” article?

  2. Yes, that’s another thing I should have pointed out in this post — Chavez admitted that he was wrong and said he would rectify his own mistake. Could you imagine *any* US president a.) admitting they might be wrong about something a policy or something they signed into law, and b.) trying to make improvements to mitigate its shortcomings? They run a far more transparent government, more accountable to the citizens of the nation, compared to the United States. Yet the American media only portrays Chavez as some crazy dictator in charge of a military regime.

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